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Rednal Hill Infant School & Nursery Class

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Maths

This is what maths looks like in our school.

 

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Mathematics- ‘do it, twist it, deepen it’

Intent

This year we have begun our journey of teaching for maths mastery, equipping children with the skills of fluency, reasoning and problem solving that they need in life beyond school. Opportunities for deepening understanding are built in to the curriculum, with challenge for rapid graspers and scaffolds to support struggling learners. Conceptual understanding is taught in tandem with procedural fluency in order to deepen mathematical thinking. Children then apply their understanding through real life problem solving activities. Progression is planned for and key skills revisited regularly.

         

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We believe that the Essential Characteristics of Mathematicians include:

  • An understanding of the important concepts and the ability to make connections within mathematics.
  • A broad range of skills in using and applying mathematics.
  • Fluent knowledge and recall of number facts.
  • To demonstrate initiative in solving problems within a wide range of contexts, including the new or the unusual.
  • The ability to think independently and to persevere when faced with challenges, showing a confidence of success.
  • To be able to embrace the value of learning from mistakes and false starts.
  • To reason, generalise and make sense of solutions.
  • Fluency in performing written and mental calculations and mathematical techniques.
  • Use a wide range of mathematical vocabulary.
  • A commitment to the passion for the subject.

Implementation

Maths is taught regularly throughout the week and lessons are taught discretely through a mastery approach. We believe that the three aims of the National Curriculum should be addressed every day, Fluency, Reasoning and Problem Solving.

Lessons begin with a problem, instead of ‘Let me teach you …’ as a starting point, children are encouraged to explore the problem themselves. This is referred to as the ‘anchor task’. Children then practice on whiteboards before attempting the ‘do it, twist it, deepen it’ elements of the lesson within their practice books. Although this might look a little different in Early Years, children are still encouraged to explore problems through an ‘anchor task’ and this is then reinforced through the indoor/outdoor environment.

Within Key Stage 1 lessons are designed for mixed ability groups, scaffolding is provided by way of support, concrete apparatus and links to previous learning. There is also an expectation that all children can achieve depth at some point within the lesson.

We access the White Rose scheme of learning, amongst other material, to inform our long term overview for Maths. We now spend longer on topic areas, rather than revisiting topics term on term. We recognise that a lack of fluency skills can be detrimental to the progress children make when accessing problem-solving activities. To address this we build in Retrieval Practice on a weekly basis to ensure fluency skills are revisited and embedded and links to previous learning built upon.

Children also practice retrieval of multiplication tables through the use of the Education City app. This is used to support children’s fluency and rapid recall of multiplication facts. Children are encouraged to access this resource outside school.

To support our children’s understanding of mathematical concepts teachers plan for rapid intervention for those that have struggled to grasp a concept. This is delivered prior to the next maths lesson, often on the same day the misconception occurred.

 Impact

  • Progress is evidenced through daily assessment for learning opportunities, marking, pupil observations and discussions.
  • Work in books is of a good quality for their age and ability.
  • Termly Maths tests evidence progress summatively and are used to support teacher assessments.
  • KS1 SATs tests demonstrate knowledge and skills taught within a test situation.
  • Monitoring within school demonstrate pupils can apply taught mathematical skills independently.
  • Pupils talk with passion during pupil conferencing about their learning in Maths. 

As a staff team we are committed to continuous improvement. We have been working closely with the Central Maths Hub and the National Centre for Excellence in the Teaching of Mathematics (NCETM) to move our teaching practices forwards. We are part of the TRG (Teacher Research Group) which involves working alongside Primary Maths Mastery Specialist for our local area- Craig Flanagan. This research project runs for a period of 2 years from 2019-2021.

The key elements of teaching for mastery can be found in this paper

Continuous provision within Maths

  • The term ‘continuous’ indicates an expectation to re-visit skills and concepts many times during the year, throughout the key stage and across the school. This gives children the best opportunity to achieve a greater depth of learning and mastery.
  • Continuous provision is a well established EYFS teaching method and is now steadily becoming embedded into KS1. Chris Quigley is an advocate in the development of continuous provision up to year 6 and staff have received bespoke training from his organisation which have inspired us to commit to continuous provision as a key teaching method.

The aim is not to ‘achieve’ learning in a lesson as if this is a final destination. Instead, pupils should have multiple opportunities to return to content, over time, in order to gain a growing developmental understanding.                                                                                      (Chris Quigley)  

  • If you would like to find out more about continuous provision click here

Enquiry Based Learning

Children who are curious are destined for success. A curious child is motivated to ask questions, seek answers, and apply those answers to his or her personal experience. We believe, that given the right conditions, every child in our school can demonstrate curiosity, an attitude of wonder, and a desire to discover.

Curiosity and motivation lie at the heart of Enquiry-based Learning. This approach to learning drives our curriculum and ensure our classrooms are high-energy learning centres, where children are excited to learn and participate. Along with rich content, it allows our children to ask themselves three questions about any new subject being introduced:  What do I already know about the subject?...  What do I want to know about the subject?... What have I learned about the subject?...

During Enquiry-based Learning many subjects, especially Maths, are intertwined in order to answer the original questions children pose, but the skills for progression are carefully considered within each subject across each year group in order to ensure depth of learning. We recognise that there is a need for the direct teaching of discrete skills and knowledge and this is balanced carefully within each Enquiry and the teaching day.

Maths in the Early Years

        

There are six main areas that collectively underpin children’s early mathematical learning, and which provide the firm foundations for the maths that children will encounter as they go up the years in primary school.

They are:

  • Cardinality and Counting: understanding that the cardinal value of a number refers to the quantity, or howmanyness of things it represents.
    explained in this link
  • Comparison: understanding that comparing numbers involves knowing which numbers are worth more or less than each other.
    explained in this link
  • Composition: understanding that one number can be made up from (composed from) two or more smaller numbers.
    explained in this link
  • Pattern: looking for and finding patterns helps children notice and understand mathematical relationships
    explained in this link
  • Shape and Space: understanding what happens when shapes move, or combine with other shapes, helps develop wider mathematical thinking
    explained in this link
  • Measures: comparing different aspects such as length, weight and volume, as a preliminary to using units to compare later.
    explained in this link


Click on the link for a breakdown of each strand and resources: (Or type in Reception schemes of work into WhiteRose)

https://whiterosemaths.com/resources/schemes-of-learning/reception-sol/

 

 

Address
Rednal Hill Infant School, Irwin Avenue, Rednal, Birmingham, B45 8QY

Phone
0121 453 2636

Email
Enquiries to Mrs D Brooke at office@rednalhill-inf.bham.sch.uk